Election 2017

In an effort to clarify their position on issues of racial and environmental justice as part of the Nova Scotia General Election of 2017, the ENRICH Project invited candidates from each political party to complete a survey with questions on the topic.

The questions posed to each party, and their answers, are listed below verbatim. Where responses were submitted on behalf of the entire party, this is indicated. Although candidates from each party were invited to answer the survey, candidates from the Atlantica Party Association of Nova Scotia and Independent parties did not respond. The Liberal Party also did not respond to the survey, only offering a statement in the form of a letter.

The ENRICH Project does not endorse any candidate or party.



QUESTIONS

1. Before being contacted by ENRICH, were you already familiar with the term “environmental racism?” (If yes, how did you hear about it?)

2. Do you think that environmental racism is a reality in Nova Scotia? (If yes, why?)

3. If you think that environmental racism is a reality in this province, how do you think it affects communities in Nova Scotia?

4. In 2015, Bill 111—the Environmental Racism Prevention Act—was debated in the Nova Scotia Legislature. Ultimately, the Bill was not adopted. Do you think that Bill 111 should have been adopted? (If yes, why?)

5. If there were one thing that you would change about Bill 111 to make it more likely to be adopted, what would it be?

6. In April 2017, a provincial, non-partisan Environmental Bill of Rights was launched by the Environmental Rights Working Group in Nova Scotia. The Bill seeks to ensure healthy air, water, and soil for all Nova Scotians, and it also highlights the disproportionate impacts of polluting industries on Indigenous, African Nova Scotian, and other marginalized communities. Do you support this Bill? (If yes, why?)

7. The Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (2012) and Nova Scotia’s Environment Act make provisions for public consultation about projects that could affect communities adversely … Do you agree with these arguments? (If yes, why?)

8. What resources and whose support would you need to address environmental racism in Nova Scotia?

9. What do you think are the major barriers to addressing environmental racism in Nova Scotia?

10. What opportunities do you see for addressing environmental racism in Nova Scotia?

11. In seeking to address environmental racism in Nova Scotia, what is the first thing that you would do?


RESPONSES

1. Before being contacted by ENRICH, were you already familiar with the term “environmental racism?” (If yes, how did you hear about it?)

Yes. The term is frequently used by the media, environmental groups, and citizens and activists who care about human rights and the environment. On April 29, 2015 the NDP introduced Bill 111, An Act to Address Environmental Racism, which the Liberal government refused to pass. ―New Democratic Party

Yes. The roots of the movement to fight environmental racism stretch back to the 1970s. The concept has grown as the environmental justice movement have grown. ―Progressive Conservative Party

Yes, I attended a presentation by Ingrid Waldron at SMU. ―Jessica Alexander, Green Party (Hammonds Plains-Lucasville)

Yes, from Lenore Zann. ―James Finnie, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Colchester North)

Maybe Laurie MacIntosh, Progressive Conservative Association of Nova Scotia (Cumberland South)

Yes, I have been to several forums where this has been the topic and I have seen some documentaries on the subject. Shelley Fashan, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Preston-Dartmouth)

Yes. The term is frequently used by the media, environmental groups, and citizens and activists who care about human rights and the environment. On April 29, 2015 the NDP introduced Bill 111, An Act to Address Environmental Racism, which the Liberal government refused to pass. Gary Burrill, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Halifax Chebucto)

Yes, environmental justice an intrinsic part of the Green movement..Anthony Edmonds, Green Party of Nova Scotia (Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank) 

Yes. The term is frequently used by the media, environmental groups, and citizens and activists who care about human rights and the environment. On April 29, 2015 the NDP introduced Bill 111, An Act to Address Environmental Racism, which the Liberal government refused to pass. Devin Ashley, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Eastern Shore)

2. Do you think that environmental racism is a reality in Nova Scotia? (If yes, why?)

Yes. Many examples of environmental racism can be seen in ENRICH’s online interactive map. Africville offers an historic example of environmental racism with multi-generational impact. There are many more case studies, including recent examples. ―New Democratic Party

Yes. There is no doubt that racism played an unfortunate role in Nova Scotia’s history. I believe racism played a role when decisions about the location of some land use projects were made. ―Progressive Conservative Party

Yes. Data proves it. ―Jessica Alexander, Green Party (Hammonds Plains-Lucasville)

Yes, through articles in the media and speaking with indigenous peoples James Finnie, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Colchester North)

Maybe Laurie MacIntosh, Progressive Conservative Association of Nova Scotia (Cumberland South)

Yes, there are maps that show where African Nova Scotian and Aboriginal ares there are greater numbers of toxic sites. Shelley Fashan, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Preston-Dartmouth)

Yes. Many examples of environmental racism can be seen in ENRICH’s online interactive map: http://www.enrichproject.org/map/. Africville offers an historic example of environmental racism with multi-generational impact. There are many more case studies, including recent examples. ―Gary Burrill, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Halifax Chebucto)

Nova Scotia has a history of environmental racism, resulting largely from historic exclusion of marginalized ethnic groups from governance. Anthony Edmonds, Green Party of Nova Scotia (Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank) 

Yes. Many examples of environmental racism can be seen in ENRICH’s online interactive map: http://www.enrichproject.org/map/. Africville offers an historic example of environmental racism with multi-generational impact. There are many more case studies, including recent examples. Devin Ashley, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Eastern Shore) 

3. If you think that environmental racism is a reality in this province, how do you think it affects communities in Nova Scotia?

Environmental racism causes serious health problems for individuals and families. It disrupts food security by introducing problems with the communities’ water and soil. It interferes with their children’s capacity to play outdoors. It undermines communities’ confidence in government’s ability and willingness to create the conditions for health and well-being. And it violates our province’s legal and moral obligations for equity and fair treatment. ―New Democratic Party

When land use projects, which may have faced strong opposition or even rejection in other areas, were put in areas where the population is made up of citizens who are visible minorities, it emphasized the power imbalance between those who made the decisions and those who had to live by those decisions. This power imbalance was pervasive throughout the entire decision-making chain. A PC team will increase the per vote funding parties receive for votes cast for women, African Nova Scotians and Indigenous candidates. This will ensure more women, African Nova Scotians and Indigenous Nova Scotians are elected and at the decision-making table. However, we are hopeful that decisions on such proposals are now made on the basis of science and solid research, and that race no longer enters into the decision-making process. And, when certain communities are being considered for projects, we want the citizens of those communities to feel empowered to voice their opinions and for those opinions to be considered. The review processes must have this as a central component. ―Progressive Conservative Party

Toxicity causes illness and social decline.Jessica Alexander, Green Party (Hammonds Plains-Lucasville District)

It affects the quality of life of the inhabitants of these communities in Nova Scotia with higher rates of cancer, asthma & learning disabilities being attributed to the fact that they are living within an area that has an environmental issue. James Finnie, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Colchester North)

No comment Laurie MacIntosh, Progressive Conservative Association of Nova Scotia (Cumberland South)

It affects them negatively in that their health can be negatively impacted, the water table could potentially be poisoned, toxins can cause many forms of cancer. It also has a negative psychological effect. It destroys the community’s property value and makes the communities less desirable to live in. Shelley Fashan, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Preston-Dartmouth)

Environmental racism causes serious health problems for individuals and families. It disrupts food security by introducing problems with the communities’ water and soil. It interferes with their children’s capacity to play outdoors. It undermines communities’ confidence in government’s ability and willingness to create the conditions for health and well-being. And it violates our province’s legal and moral obligations for equity and fair treatment. ―Gary Burrill, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Halifax Chebucto)

Environmental racism affects communities in Nova Scotia in much the same way that poor environmental policy affects communities worldwide: by adversely affecting the health and well being of impacted individuals. Anthony Edmonds, Green Party of Nova Scotia (Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank)

Environmental racism causes serious health problems for individuals and families. It disrupts food security by introducing problems with the communities’ water and soil. It interferes with their children’s capacity to play outdoors. It undermines communities’ confidence in government’s ability and willingness to create the conditions for health and well-being. And it violates our province’s legal and moral obligations for equity and fair treatment. Devin Ashley, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Eastern Shore)

4. In 2015, Bill 111—the Environmental Racism Prevention Act—was debated in the Nova Scotia Legislature. Ultimately, the Bill was not adopted. Do you think that Bill 111 should have been adopted? (If yes, why?)

Yes, we think that Bill 111 – which was brought to the House by NDP MLA Lenore Zann as a Private Member’s Bill – should have been adopted. The Bill would have established a panel to examine issues of environmental racism and to provide recommendations to address these issues. ―New Democratic Party

Yes, environmental pollutions that are intentional or neglectful and targetted to marginalized communities represents a breach of human rights. Jessica Alexander, Green Party (Hammonds Plains-Lucasville District)

Yes, Because something needs to be done about this issue for ALL Nova Scotians. James Finnie, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Colchester North)

Maybe Laurie MacIntosh, Progressive Conservative Association of Nova Scotia (Cumberland South)

No, I have to study it more than in just a few minutes and have some background information. Shelley Fashan, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Preston-Dartmouth)

Yes, we think that Bill 111, which was brought to the House by NDP MLA Lenore Zann as a Private Member’s Bill, should have been adopted. The Bill would have established a panel to examine issues of environmental racism and to provide recommendations to address these issues. ―Gary Burrill, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Halifax Chebucto)

Yes, the bill was well thought out and necessary.Anthony Edmonds, Green Party of Nova Scotia (Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank)

Yes, we think that Bill 111, which was brought to the House by NDP MLA Lenore Zann as a Private Member’s Bill, should have been adopted. The Bill would have established a panel to examine issues of environmental racism and to provide recommendations to address these issues. Devin Ashley, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Eastern Shore)

5. If there were one thing that you would change about Bill 111 to make it more likely to be adopted, what would it be?

In our view, Bill 111 does not need any modification. We simply need a government committed to opposing environmental racism and willing to support a Bill that would prevent it. However, if there are ways to make the Bill more effective, we are open to discussing possible amendments. ―New Democratic Party

Ultimately, it was up the McNeil Liberals to decide if Bill 111 was adopted.  They controlled the legislative agenda, including which bills would come to a vote.  The bill was debated at Second Reading, but the Liberals did not allow it to proceed to a clause by clause examination or to the Law Amendments committee where MLAs could ask questions and truly understand what Nova Scotians thought of it. A Progressive Conservative government believes that racism of any form is unacceptable. A Progressive Conservative government will be reviewing our legislative and regulatory framework to be sure that Nova Scotia engages in sustainable development. The environmental racism bill will be a part of that review. ―Progressive Conservative Party

I would not dictate representation from minority “communities” unless they are legitimate representatives agreed upon by those communities. There is not one single voice to represent those diverse demographics, and representation should rather be from areas affected by environmental racism than merely from one racial or ethnic group, which may or may not have been affected by environmental racism. Ontario has such a Bill in place which goes much farther in its expectation than this bill does. Jessica Alexander, Green Party (Hammonds Plains-Lucasville District)

Needs to be more representative of all those suffering from environmental racism. James Finnie, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Colchester North) 

No comment Laurie MacIntosh, Progressive Conservative Association of Nova Scotia (Cumberland South)

The committee should be represented as it creates a balance. Shelley Fashan, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Preston-Dartmouth)

In our view, Bill 111 does not need any modification. We simply need a government committed to opposing environmental racism and willing to support a Bill that would prevent it. However, if there are ways to make the Bill more effective, we are open to discussing possible amendments. ―Gary Burrill, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Halifax Chebucto)

The largest obstacle to Bill 111’s adoption seemed to be lack of public awareness of the issue that it addresses to provide the needed political pressure on governing MLAs. Anthony Edmonds, Green Party of Nova Scotia (Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank)

In our view, Bill 111 does not need any modification. We simply need a government committed to opposing environmental racism and willing to support a Bill that would prevent it. However, if there are ways to make the Bill more effective, we are open to discussing possible amendments. Devin Ashley, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Eastern Shore) 

6. In April 2017, a provincial, non-partisan Environmental Bill of Rights was launched by the Environmental Rights Working Group in Nova Scotia. The Bill seeks to ensure healthy air, water, and soil for all Nova Scotians, and it also highlights the disproportionate impacts of polluting industries on Indigenous, African Nova Scotian, and other marginalized communities.

Do you support this Bill? (If yes, why?)

Yes. In October 2016, NDP MLA Denise Peterson-Rafuse brought an Environmental Bill of Rights to the House as a Private Member’s Bill. We believe an Environmental Bill of Rights is an important legal tool. The NDP supports the Environmental Bill of Rights launched by the Environmental Rights Working Group in April 2017. This Bill is very explicit about the need to eliminate environmental racism and engage in consultation with First Nations and Indigenous communities. The NDP record is clear on these issues. ―New Democratic Party

A Progressive Conservative government would support the principles of the bill and would consult with the Environmental Rights Working Group in Nova Scotia.  The PC Platform commits to pass a Clean Air Act which, in many ways, strives for the same goals.  Additionally, the PC platform commits to renewing the Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act which ensures a healthy environment and a healthy economy go hand-in-hand. A Progressive Conservative government believes that racism of any form is unacceptable. A Progressive Conservative government will be reviewing our legislative and regulatory framework to be sure that Nova Scotia engages in sustainable development. ―Progressive Conservative Party

Yes, I support this bill because it aims to rectify, using current legal systems, the historic violence perpetrated against indigenous and African Nova Scotian communities. Jessica Alexander, Green Party (Hammonds Plains-Lucasville District)

Yes, as stated in the bill every Nova Scotian has the right to environmentally safe land, air and water. James Finnie, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Colchester North)

Maybe Laurie MacIntosh, Progressive Conservative Association of Nova Scotia (Cumberland South)

Yes, it contains the important protections for these marginalized communities. Shelley Fashan, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Preston-Dartmouth)

Yes. In October 2016, NDP MLA Denise Peterson-Rafuse brought an Environmental Bill of Rights to the House as a Private Member’s Bill. We believe an Environmental Bill of Rights is an important legal tool. The NDP supports the Environmental Bill of Rights launched by the Environmental Rights Working Group in April 2017. This Bill is very explicit about the need to eliminate environmental racism and engage in consultation with First Nations and Indigenous communities. The NDP record is clear on these issues. ―Gary Burrill, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Halifax Chebucto)

Yes, the right to a healthy environment seems like a logical corollary of many related rights. Given the diffuse nature of environmental issues, this link needs to be made explicit through law. Anthony Edmonds, Green Party of Nova Scotia (Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank)

Yes. In October 2016, NDP MLA Denise Peterson-Rafuse brought an Environmental Bill of Rights to the House as a Private Member’s Bill. We believe an Environmental Bill of Rights is an important legal tool. The NDP supports the Environmental Bill of Rights launched by the Environmental Rights Working Group in April 2017. This Bill is very explicit about the need to eliminate environmental racism and engage in consultation with First Nations and Indigenous communities. The NDP record is clear on these issues. Devin Ashley, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Eastern Shore) 

7. The Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (2012) and Nova Scotia’s Environment Act make provisions for public consultation about projects that could affect communities adversely.

Canadian law also stipulates that Aboriginal communities must be consulted when government and industry undertakings could interfere adversely with Aboriginal title or Aboriginal rights, such as the right to fish or to harvest other resources. Mi’kmaw and African Nova Scotian communities in this province have argued that these consultation processes are insufficient.

They argue that affected communities are often consulted after proposed projects have been designed and approved, at points in time when community feedback can have very little impact. They also contend that the processes lack transparency, and that the quality of the consultation is often weak: important information may not be accessible to all, and the processes tend not to reflect or accommodate the cultural and linguistic heritages of Mi’kmaw and African Nova Scotian peoples.

Do you agree with these arguments? (If yes, why?)

YES. The NDP agrees that community consultations must be transparent, informed, engaged, and must accommodate the cultural and linguistic traditions of the communities whose input is sought. Consultations that do not meet this standard are not meaningful and do not respect the spirit of the Acts’ provisions. They are unacceptable. ―New Democratic Party

The record of the McNeil government on meaningful consultation has been dismal.  We have witnessed several bills that were stalled and sent back to the department because it was clear that if consultation was done at all, it was insufficient.  Too often, these Liberal bills did not reflect the views or concerns of the people who would be most affected by them.  Other times, the Liberals waited until after drafting legislation to consult. That is unacceptable, particularly from a party that promised Nova Scotians it would be the most open and transparent government in the country. A Progressive Conservative government will listen to Nova Scotians and always factor their views into decisions. ―Progressive Conservative Party 

Yes, The processes currently being practiced results in corporate interests overriding local community needs. Economic promise is often more politically expedient. Marginalized communities then must resort to expensive legal petitions to maintain their rights. Jessica Alexander, Green Party (Hammonds Plains-Lucasville District)

Yes. This tends to be the trend with large companies and government bills. And we deserve change: plain English and a format easily understandable by all. James Finnie, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Colchester North)

Maybe Laurie MacIntosh, Progressive Conservative Association of Nova Scotia (Cumberland South)

Yes, this type of consultation has happened in the past and it needs to stop. Consultation should take place at the first stages of any type of development that may adversely interfere with Aboriginal communities and rights.Shelley Fashan, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Preston-Dartmouth)

Yes. The NDP agrees that community consultations must be transparent, informed, engaged, and must accommodate the cultural and linguistic traditions of the communities whose input is sought. Consultations that do not meet this standard are not meaningful and do not respect the spirit of the Acts’ provisions. They are unacceptable. ―Gary Burrill, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Halifax Chebucto)

Yes, ensuring adequate transparency and thorough consultation for projects with environmental impact will necessarily require a dedication to the spirit of the consultation that goes beyond simply carrying out the legally mandated process to the letter of the law. Anthony Edmonds, Green Party of Nova Scotia (Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank)

YES. The NDP agrees that community consultations must be transparent, informed, engaged, and must accommodate the cultural and linguistic traditions of the communities whose input is sought. Consultations that do not meet this standard are not meaningful and do not respect the spirit of the Acts’ provisions. They are unacceptable. Devin Ashley, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Eastern Shore) 

8. What resources and whose support would you need to address environmental racism in Nova Scotia?

Addressing environmental racism has two components: We need to redress past incidents and we need to prevent future occurrences. For both components, we need legal and legislative resources, financial resources for research and community consultation, and political will and commitment. ―New Democratic Party

A Progressive Conservative government would find the resources to undertake wide and meaningful consultation with Nova Scotians.  We will do our best to accommodate cultural and historical diversity and to share the information upon which decisions are made. ―Progressive Conservative Party

I am using the Green Party of Nova Scotia as my resource and mechanism for support. Jessica Alexander, Green Party (Hammonds Plains-Lucasville District)

Media, Community & Government support is required and a greater understanding by the large businesses involved what impact this has on their fellow Nova Scotians. We also need the support of other businesses not directly involved in Environmental Racism to control the amount of waste their product/service produces and ensure that recycling facilities exist and are in use. James Finnie, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Colchester North)

No comment Laurie MacIntosh, Progressive Conservative Association of Nova Scotia (Cumberland South)

Everyones participation, particularly the communities involved and the government and non-governmental agencies. Shelley Fashan, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Preston-Dartmouth)

Addressing environmental racism has two components: We need to redress past incidents and we need to prevent future occurrences. For both components, we need legal and legislative resources, financial resources for research and community consultation, and political will and commitment. ―Gary Burrill, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Halifax Chebucto)

Properly addressing environmental racism may require the support of many stakeholders outside of traditional social justice or environmentalist movements. The level of public awareness of this issue is unfortunately very low. Anthony Edmonds, Green Party of Nova Scotia (Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank)

Addressing environmental racism has two components: We need to redress past incidents and we need to prevent future occurrences. For both components, we need legal and legislative resources, financial resources for research and community consultation, and political will and commitment. Devin Ashley, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Eastern Shore)

9. What do you think are the major barriers to addressing environmental racism in Nova Scotia?

The biggest barrier to addressing environmental racism is a lack of political will and commitment. ―New Democratic Party

Addressing environmental racism is a matter of meaningful consultation, transparent decision making and a sincere desire of government to ensure a safe environment for everyone through evidence-based decision-making. ―Progressive Conservative Party

The unwillingness of the holders of political and economic power to address the magnitude of historical and present white domination. Jessica Alexander, Green Party (Hammonds Plains-Lucasville District)

Money. Lack of laws governing recycling & Manufacturing processes. Import quality control. (e.g. packaging, chemical composition). James Finnie, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Colchester North)

No comment Laurie MacIntosh, Progressive Conservative Association of Nova Scotia (Cumberland South)

The systemic infrastructure and policies that do not take into account the historical and cultural heritage of the historically marginalized communities and Aboriginal communites. Shelley Fashan, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Preston-Dartmouth)

The biggest barrier to addressing environmental racism is a lack of political will and commitment. ―Gary Burrill, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Halifax Chebucto)

The greatest barrier to addressing environmental racism in Nova Scotia is the lack of public awareness of the issue. Anthony Edmonds, Green Party of Nova Scotia (Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank)

The biggest barrier to addressing environmental racism is a lack of political will and commitment. Devin Ashley, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Eastern Shore) 

10. What opportunities do you see for addressing environmental racism in Nova Scotia?

We believe that the following opportunities would help to address environmental racism: more research to clearly and unequivocally demonstrate the depth and breadth of environmental racism; more research products, such as maps, charts, tables, and case studies, to succinctly explain, convince, and arouse widespread public support; and more legal challenges. ―New Democratic Party

A Progressive Conservative government sees the value in a clean environment – to the health of our people, to the health of our economy and to our tourism industry.  When addressing issues that affect our environment, we must take into account the views of all people.  Racism in any form is unacceptable. Renewing the Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act, enacting a Clean Air Act, developing a meaningful consultation process and considering legislation to combat environmental damage are all great opportunities to address environmental racism. ―Progressive Conservative Party

Keep doing what you are doing. I will keep doing what I am doing. Jessica Alexander, Green Party (Hammonds Plains-Lucasville District)

All problems need to be addressed at the root. Environmental Racism is not something that can be fixed overnight. More stringent laws need to be in place with regards, recycling & manufacturing processes and transparency of plans & regulations. James Finnie, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Colchester North)

No comment Laurie MacIntosh, Progressive Conservative Association of Nova Scotia (Cumberland South)

Many, community engagement, government consultation, research and policy development and protection. There is a lot that can be done. Shelley Fashan, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Preston-Dartmouth)

We believe that the following opportunities would help to address environmental racism: more research to clearly and unequivocally demonstrate the depth and breadth of environmental racism; more research products, such as maps, charts, tables, and case studies, to succinctly explain, convince, and arouse widespread public support; and more legal challenges. ―Gary Burrill, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Halifax Chebucto)

A move toward clean sources of renewable energy could eliminate entirely many of the worst sources of localized air pollution that impact Nova Scotia communities – coal-fired power plants. Anthony Edmonds, Green Party of Nova Scotia (Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank)

We believe that the following opportunities would help to address environmental racism: more research to clearly and unequivocally demonstrate the depth and breadth of environmental racism; more research products, such as maps, charts, tables, and case studies, to succinctly explain, convince, and arouse widespread public support; and more legal challenges. Devin Ashley, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Eastern Shore)

11. In seeking to address environmental racism in Nova Scotia, what is the first thing that you would do?

If elected government, the NDP commits to passing the following legislative actions which we previously introduced to the House: the Environmental Racism Prevention Act, the Environmental Bill of Rights, and a Bill to modernize and democratize the environmental assessment process. ―New Democratic Party

A Progressive Conservative government would meet with African Nova Scotian and Indigenous communities first to develop a process that works for their communities. ―Progressive Conservative Party

I think your group is doing well, holding a press event, doing public education. Another option would be to create a documentary film to highlight the situation. Jessica Alexander, Green Party (Hammonds Plains-Lucasville District)

Create sustainable models of practice to control & regulate. Raise awareness. James Finnie, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Colchester North)

No comment Laurie MacIntosh, Progressive Conservative Association of Nova Scotia (Cumberland South)

Study the legislation, engage in community consultation and enact the necessary legislation. Shelley Fashan, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Preston-Dartmouth)

If elected government, the NDP commits to passing the following legislative actions which we previously introduced to the House: the Environmental Racism Prevention Act, the Environmental Bill of Rights, and a Bill to modernize and democratize the environmental assessment process. ―Gary Burrill, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Halifax Chebucto)

If I could have the support of the Nova Scotia Legislature, I would implement a carbon fee and dividend system to simultaneously put pressure on dirty sources of electricity and reduce the financial and social inequity associated with the imbalanced consumption of dirty fossil fuel sourced energy. Anthony Edmonds, Green Party of Nova Scotia (Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank)

If elected government, the NDP commits to passing the following legislative actions which we previously introduced to the House: the Environmental Racism Prevention Act, the Environmental Bill of Rights, and a Bill to modernize and democratize the environmental assessment process. Devin Ashley, Nova Scotia New Democratic Party (Eastern Shore)



Statement from the Liberal Party of NS

Dear Dr. Waldron,

Please accept this response to your online survey questions on behalf of all 51 Liberal Candidates across the Province of Nova Scotia.

Our party is very much aware of the negative impact communities in Nova Scotia have experienced as a result of past decisions. Operations such as landfills, trash incinerators and other environmentally hazardous activities were permitted to operate without acceptable standards or accountability to ensure the health and wellbeing of their nearby communities.

The Environment Act regulates and ensures that qualified individuals review and make recommendations and/or decisions on activities that may result in pollutants, whether it be air, water or land based, being released into the environment.

Approvals today often come with extensive lists of terms and conditions stipulating what the thresholds are and what mitigating actions need to be taken to minimize the risk of exceeding these terms and conditions. Compliance review investigations exist and in some cases, penalties and punitive action is taken, including the closure of operations.

The most important piece of our province’s environmental legislation is the commitment to hold extensive public consultations with the communities that could be affected by a proposed development. This allows for all Nova Scotians to have the opportunity to share comments and put forward their concerns before any proposed development can receive approval.

The Liberal Party is proud of our commitment to work with government officials at all levels; whether it be federal, provincial or municipal; to work towards addressing environmental challenges. We as a government worked extensively with the Pictou Landing First Nation on the issue of Boat Harbour, which resulted in the passage of legislation in 2015 that will lead to the sites eventual closure and remediation.

We note with great interest your mandate to conduct government consultations. The Liberal Caucus has met with hundreds of groups who have expressed interest in making presentations to discuss the issues of importance to them. We would welcome the opportunity to schedule a meeting in the future with the ENRICH Project after Caucus resumes in June, to have the opportunity to hear directly from you.

On behalf of the 51 Liberal Candidates, thank you for your passion and dedication to advocacy. Sincerely

Nova Scotia Liberal Campaign

[End of Statement]

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